Advanced Rhyming



What Is You Go Rhymes!?

Hi! My name is James Cordeiro. In my life, I've done a lot of things. This wasn't a planned one. I didn't mean to start this website. It was an accident turned into a dramatically brilliant and fun project. What Rhymes With (yougorhymes.com) by me, James A Cordeiro is a free online rhyming dictionary with every word matched to every rhyme type & scheme. I still have loads of work and hours to put into this project before it is 100% accurate for your rhyming needs, but I will continue until I reach that point. Please provide any and all suggestions you can to support@yougorhymes.com or feel free to leave comments around the website using the comment box - I read them all.

"The largest part of my project is not perfect rhymes, it's macaronic rhymes - the rhyming of two languages." ~ James ~

Top Question: How Do Votes Work

*Beta: Voting system is a work in progress and is subject to change.*

Currently we need votes to help identify incorrect rhymes, once the connection has 100 user votes, if the rhyme has 30% or less Yes votes, we will place the rhyme into an "unsure" category. This will place the rhyme into our member review queue. The queue allows our members to discuss with each other whether two words rhymes with each other, and which rhyme type or scheme it should belong in. Even without the rhyme review queue, if after 100 unique user votes the rhyme shows 0% the connection will automatically be removed without a review except through our administrator (Me). The reason I allow so many votes before removal is because I have found most people don't know there is more than one type of rhyme. Most people believe "Love does not rhyme with Move" because they don't necessarily have a similar sound when spoken. However, this is incorrect! Love does rhyme with move if you are searching for "Eye Rhymes", thus, the extra feature for voting rhyme type and rhyme scheme has been included. Sooner or later, we will have one beautiful arrangement of over One Million words and rhymes. So, by voting, you will see yougorhymes.com become an amazing tool for finding those "perfect rhymes" you may be searching for.

Why Did I Allow Non-English Words?

As mentioned above, perfect rhymes are not the only type of rhyme, thus, Macaronic Rhymes have been included into our rhyming dictionary. When it comes to poetry and rhyming of words, sometimes by knowing the definition of a non-english word, it can fit beautifully to any rhyme. If it sounds similar, maybe with the same syllables. Since creativity is a part of poetry, you may want to use a non-english word. This type of rhyme is called a macaronic rhyme. I encourage you to submit any word, as long as it is family friendly and contains alphanumeric characters.

Rhyme Related Advertisements

Since it costs me a lot of money to keep this website functioning, I had to employ some sort of monetization for yougorhymes.com - I chose Google Adsense for the relevance and targeting of rhyming dictionary advertisements. Although it generates some revenue, it is not nearly enough to cover costs of developing and maintaining this website. Any donations, or language related advertising to replace the Adsense is extremely appreciated. I want to ensure when you visit this website, you are not leaving through non-relevant links and advertisements which is why Adsense has been implemented for current monetization.

How I Calculate The Rhymes

I will be explaining this process soon, however the technology that has undergone this process may become a proprietary software and subject to copyright through investor relations.

Unlike most rhyming websites, I have taken a completely different approach by ensuring you don't just get one type of rhyme or only a few, but you get for any particular word (ex. eye/bye which is a perfect rhyme) every other rhyme type I could possibly include. I promise to provide you results for each and every rhyme type so you are not lost in a perfect rhyme world. These rhyme types include:

  • # Assonant - Rhyming of similar vowels but different consonants. Example: dip/limp
  • # Consonant - Similar consonants but different vowels. Example: limp/lump
  • # Eye - Based on spelling and not on sound. Example: love/move
  • # Feminine (double, triple, extra-syllable, multi-syllable, extended) - Differing beginnings followed by multiple rhyming syllables. Example: drinking/shrinking
  • # Identical - Uses the same word to rhyme with itself however may hold a different meaning.
  • # Light Line - Rhyming of a stressed syllable with a secondary stress. Example: mat/combat
  • # Macaronic - Rhyming of two words with different languages.
  • # Masculine - Differing consonant sounds ending with identically stressed syllables. Example: report/support
  • # Near - (half, slant, approximate, off, oblique) Final consonant sounds the same but initial consonants and vowel sounds are different. Example: tought/sat
  • # Perfect - (exact, true, full) Begins with different sounds and end with the same. Example: pie/die
  • # Rich - (French for rime riche) Word that rhymes with its homonym. Example: blue/blew
  • # Scarce - Rhyming of words with limited rhyming alternatives. Example: whisp/lisp
  • # Wrenched

Rhyme Schemes

They may be a different types of rhymes as mentioned above, and could be matched for a type of rhyme scheme. As you browse this website, each identified rhyme will have a link to its rhyme scheme, and rhyme type. Below are the rhyme schemes you will find.

My Mission

My mission is to ensure you have access to the most educational rhyming resource available for any word. You will find an answer to any rhyme for any word through proven linguistics analysis, thus, never leaving this rhyming dictionary without an answer. I will acheive this mission.

What Is In The Future?

I plan to create the most thoroughly investigative, programmatic algorithm to analyze each word, phrase and text collection into the most in-depth word analysis tool available on the web. This technology is not new, but, the rhyming algorithm has taken me hundreds of hours, many sleepless nights, and the combination of some extremely intelligent complex minds who really helped me out to get the right collection of knowledge into one central information centre called (You Go Rhyme) formerly "What Rhymes With" - I am working extremely hard to get this project complete. Please come back again.

What Do I Analyze

Although I am working to go far into the world of linguistics, many forms and language have a tendency to combat and attack each other. I will collect this data, and provide this to you for your own analysis. And in order to fulfil my mission, I am excited to indicate that I will analyze many forms of speech, and from the utilized complex minds and friends to help determine how to analyze and interpret our in-depth research.

To find words in relation to each other through rhymes and linguistics, even theoretical linguistic technology. I have gone so far in-depth for each word that my mind is mush, but you will find answers relating to your rhyme for the following linguistics, some are not yet active but are in progress, or complete just have yet to update this page.

Analyzed Linguistics For Rhyming

  • Theoretical linguistics
  • Cognitive linguistics
  • Generative linguistics
  • Quantitative linguistics
  • Phonology
  • Morphology
  • Syntax
  • Lexis
  • Semantics
  • Pragmatics
  • Descriptive linguistics
  • Anthropological linguistics
  • Comparative linguistics
  • Historical linguistics
  • Etymology
  • Phonetics
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Applied linguistics
  • Computational linguistics
  • Forensic linguistics
  • Language acquisition
  • Language assessment
  • Language development
  • Language education
  • Linguistic prescription
  • Linguistic anthropology
  • Neurolinguistics
  • Psycholinguistics
  • Stylistics

Theoretical linguistics

Coming soon...

Cognitive linguistics

In linguistics, cognitive linguistics (CL) refers to the branch of linguistics that interprets language in terms of the concepts, sometimes universal, sometimes specific to a particular tongue, which underlie its forms. It is thus closely associated with semantics but is distinct from psycholinguistics, which draws upon empirical findings from cognitive psychology in order to explain the mental processes that underlie the acquisition, storage, production and understanding of speech and writing.

Cognitive linguistics is characterized by adherence to three central positions. First, it denies that there is an autonomous linguistic faculty in the mind; second, it understands grammar in terms of conceptualization; and third, it claims that knowledge of language arises out of language use.

Generative linguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Quantitative linguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Phonology

In the works. Check back real soon...

Morphology

In the works. Check back real soon...

Syntax

In the works. Check back real soon...

Lexis

In the works. Check back real soon...

Semantics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Pragmatics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Descriptive linguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Anthropological linguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Comparative linguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Historical linguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Etymology

In the works. Check back real soon...

Phonetics

Phonetics (from the Greek: phone, "sound, voice") is a branch of linguistics that comprises the study of the sounds of human speech. It is concerned with the physical properties of speech sounds (phones): their physiological production, acoustic properties, auditory perception, and neurophysiological status. Phonology, on the other hand, is concerned with abstract, grammatical characterization of systems of sounds.

We have been working on a complex algorithm to crack the matching code of phonetics with the english language for your rhyming purposes. You will soon see a phonetics symbol next to each word matched with a phonetic connection.

Sociolinguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Applied linguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Computational linguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Forensic linguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Language acquisition

In the works. Check back real soon...

Language assessment

In the works. Check back real soon...

Language development

In the works. Check back real soon...

Language education

In the works. Check back real soon...

Linguistic prescription

In the works. Check back real soon...

Linguistic anthropology

In the works. Check back real soon...

Neurolinguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Psycholinguistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Stylistics

In the works. Check back real soon...

Sources Of Information

I have read more information on the English language, rhyming, literature and other than I have in any other study of my life. And let me tell you, the English language is so fricken confusing!.

  • Princeton University "About WordNet." WordNet. Princeton University. 2010. <http://wordnet.princeton.edu>
  • Barnhart, Robert K., ed., Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology, H.W. Wilson Co., 1988.
  • Buck, Carl Darling, A Dictionary of Selected Synonyms in the Principal Indo-European Languages, University of Chicago, 1949, reprinted 1988.
  • Farmer, John S., Slang and Its Analogues Past and Present, London, 1890.
  • Fowler, H.W., A Dictionary of Modern English Usage, Oxford Univ. Press, 1926.
  • Gamillscheg, Ernst, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Französischen Sprache, Heidelberg, Carl Winter, 1928.
  • Hall, J.R. Clark, A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, Cambridge University Press, 1894, reprint with supplement by Herbert D. Meritt, 1984, University of Toronto Press.
  • Hindley, Alan, Frederick W. Langley, Brian J. Levy, Old French-English Dictionary, Cambridge University Press, 2000.
  • Kipfer, Barbara Ann, ed., and Robert L. Chapman, Dictionary of American Slang, 4th ed., HarperCollins, 2007.
  • Klein, Dr. Ernest, A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, Amsterdam: Elsevier Scientific Publishing Co., 1971.
  • Lewis, Charlton T., Elementary Latin Dictionary, Oxford, 1890.
  • Liddell, Henry George, and Robert Scott, eds., Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon, Oxford Univ. Press, 1883.
  • Room, Adrian, Place Names of the World, 2nd ed., McFarland & Co., 2006.
  • The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., Clarendon Press, 1989.
  • Simpson, D.P., Cassell's New Latin Dictionary, Funk & Wagnall's, 1959.
  • Stratmann, Francis H., & Henry Bradley, A Middle-English Dictionary, Oxford, 1891.
  • Watkins, Calvert, ed., The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, 2nd ed., Houghton Mifflin Co., 2000.
  • Weekley, Ernest, An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English, John Murray, 1921; reprint 1967, Dover Publications.

OTHER SOURCES

  • Agnes, Michael, ed. in chief, Webster's New World College Dictionary, fourth edition, MacMillan, 1999.
  • Allen, Richard Hinckley, Star Names and Their Meanings, London: Stechert, 1899.
  • Ayto, John, Dictionary of Word Origins, Arcade Publishing, 1990.
  • ----------, 20th Century Words, Oxford University Press, 1999.
  • Bardsley, Charles Wareing, English Surnames, London: Chatto and Windus, 5th ed., 1915.
  • Barney, Stephen A., Word-Hoard, Yale University Press, 1977.
  • Bartlett, John Russell, Dictionary of Americanisms, New York, 1848.
  • Bright, William, Native American Placenames of the United States, University of Oklahoma Press, 2004.
  • Emery, H.G., and K.G. Brewster, eds., The New Century Dictionary, New York: The Century Co., 1927.
  • Farmer, David Hugh, Oxford Dictionary of Saints, Oxford Paperback, 1978.
  • Fowler, H.W., A Dictionary of Modern English Usage, 2nd edition, revised by Sir Ernest Gowers, Oxford Univ. Press, 1965.
  • Gelling, Margaret, Signposts to the Past: Place-Names and the History of England, Chichester: Phillimore & Co., 3rd ed., 1997.
  • Gildersleeve, Basil L., Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar, Macmillan & Co., 1895.
  • Gordon, E.V., An Introduction to Old Norse, 2nd ed., rev., Oxford University Press, 1956.
  • Hindley, Alan, Frederick W. Langley, Brian J. Levy, Old French-English Dictionary, Cambridge University Press, 2000.
  • Kipfer, Barbara Ann, ed., and Robert L. Chapman, Dictionary of American Slang, 4th ed., HarperCollins, 2007.
  • Klein, Dr. Ernest, A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, Amsterdam: Elsevier Scientific Publishing Co., 1971.
  • Liddell, Henry George, and Robert Scott, eds., Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon, Oxford Univ. Press, 1883.
  • Barnhart, Robert K., ed., Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology, H.W. Wilson Co., 1988.
  • Buck, Carl Darling, A Dictionary of Selected Synonyms in the Principal Indo-European Languages, University of Chicago, 1949, reprinted 1988.
  • Cassidy, Frederic G., and Hall, Joan Houston, eds., Dictionary of American Regional English, Harvard University Press, 1985-2002.
  • Farmer, John S., Slang and Its Analogues Past and Present, London, 1890.
  • Fowler, H.W., A Dictionary of Modern English Usage, Oxford Univ. Press, 1926.
  • Gamillscheg, Ernst, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Französischen Sprache, Heidelberg, Carl Winter, 1928.
  • Hall, J.R. Clark, A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, Cambridge University Press, 1894, reprint with supplement by Herbert D. Meritt, University of Toronto Press, 1984.
  • Lewis, Charlton T., Elementary Latin Dictionary, Oxford, 1890.
  • Liberman, Anatoly, Analytic Dictionary of English Etymology, University of Minnesota Press, 2008.
  • The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., Clarendon Press, 1989.
  • Watkins, Calvert, ed., The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, 2nd ed., Houghton Mifflin Co., 2000.
  • Weekley, Ernest, An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English, John Murray, 1921; reprint 1967, Dover Publications.
  • Zoëga, Geir T., A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, reprint, University of Toronto Press, 2004.
  • McSparran, Frances, chief editor, The Middle English Compendium, University of Michigan, 2006.
  • Room, Adrian, Place Names of the World, 2nd ed., McFarland & Co., 2006.
  • OTHER SOURCES
  • Agnes, Michael, ed. in chief, Webster's New World College Dictionary, fourth edition, MacMillan, 1999.
  • Allen, Richard Hinckley, Star Names and Their Meanings, London: Stechert, 1899.
  • Ayto, John, Dictionary of Word Origins, Arcade Publishing, 1990.
  • ----------, 20th Century Words, Oxford University Press, 1999.
  • Bardsley, Charles Wareing, English Surnames, London: Chatto and Windus, 5th ed., 1915.
  • Barney, Stephen A., Word-Hoard, Yale University Press, 1977.
  • Bartlett, John Russell, Dictionary of Americanisms, 2nd ed., Boston, Little, Brown and Company, 1859.
  • Brachet, A., An Etymological Dictionary of the French Language, transl. G.W. Kitchin, Oxford, 1882.
  • Bright, William, Native American Placenames of the United States, University of Oklahoma Press, 2004.
  • Brockett, John Trotter, A Glossary of North Country Words, Newcastle, 1829.
  • Chappel, C., Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit and Pickpocket Eloquence, London, 1811.
  • Brockett, John Trotter, A Glossary of North Country Words, Newcastle, 1829.
  • Chappel, C., Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit and Pickpocket Eloquence, London, 1811.
  • Einhorn, E., Old French, a Concise Handbook, Cambridge Univ. Press, 1974.
  • Elson, Louis C., Elson's Music Dictionary, Boston: Oliver Ditson Co., 1905.
  • Craigie, Sir William A., and James R. Hulbert, A Dictionary of American English on Historical Principles, University of Chicago Press, 1938.
  • Donkin, T.C., An Etymological Dictionary of the Romance Languages, Edinburgh, 1864.
  • Elson, Louis C., Elson's Music Dictionary, Boston: Oliver Ditson Co., 1905.
  • Emery, H.G., and K.G. Brewster, eds., The New Century Dictionary, New York: The Century Co., 1927.
  • Farmer, David Hugh, Oxford Dictionary of Saints, Oxford Paperback, 1978.
  • Fowler, H.W., A Dictionary of Modern English Usage, 2nd edition, revised by Sir Ernest Gowers, Oxford Univ. Press, 1965.
  • Gelling, Margaret, Signposts to the Past: Place-Names and the History of England, Chichester: Phillimore & Co., 3rd ed., 1997.
  • Gildersleeve, Basil L., Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar, Macmillan & Co., 1895.
  • Gordon, E.V., An Introduction to Old Norse, 2nd ed., rev., Oxford University Press, 1956.
  • Grimm, Jacob, and Wilhelm Grimm, Deutsches Wörterbuch, Leipzig, S. Hirzel, 1911.
  • Hatefeld, Adolphe, & Arsène Darmesteter, Dictionnaire Général de la Langue Française, Paris, Librairie Delagrave, 1926.
  • Tucker, T.G., Etymological Dictionary of Latin, Ares Publishers, 1976 (reprint of 1931 edition).
  • Upton, Clive & J.D.A. Widdowson, An Atlas of English Dialect, Oxford Univ. Press, 1996.
  • Venezky, Richard L., The American Way of Spelling, The Guilford Press, 1999.
  • Stratmann, Francis H., & Henry Bradley, A Middle-English Dictionary, Oxford, 1891.
  • Thayer, Joseph Henry, Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, American Book Co., 1889.
  • Thornton, Richard H., An American Glossary, Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1912.
  • Watts, Victor, The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names, Cambridge Univ. Press, 2004.
  • Wilson, R.M., and Reaney, Percy H., Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., Oxford Univ. Press, 1995.
  • Hoblyn, Richard Dennis, A Dictionary of Term Used in Medicine, 2nd ed., London, 1844.
  • Holthausen, Ferd., Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Englischen Sprache, Leipzig, Bernhard Tauchnitz, 1927.
  • Jamieson, John, D.D., A Dictionary of the Scottish Language (abridged edition), Edinburgh, 1846.
  • Johnson, Francis, A Dictionary of Persian, Arabic, and English, London, 1852.
  • Mencken, H.L., The American Language, Alfred A. Knopf, 4th ed., 1965.
  • Mills, A.D., A Dictionary of English Place Names, 2nd ed., Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • Monier-Williams, Sir Monier, A Sanskrit-English Dictionary, Etymologically and Philologically Arranged, Oxford University Press, 1899.
  • Partridge, Eric, Slang To-day and Yesterday, 3rd ed., Barnes & Noble, 1950.
  • Pokorny, Julius, Indogermanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch, Tübingen, A. Francke Verlag, 1959.
  • Rawson, Hugh, Wicked Words, Crown Publishers, 1989.
  • Simpson, D.P., Cassell's New Latin Dictionary, Funk & Wagnall's, 1959.
  • Smith, William, ed., A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: John Murray, 1878.
  • Karttunen, Frances, An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl, University of Texas, 1983.
  • Kent, Roland G., Old Persian, New Haven, Conn., American Oriental Society, 1953.
  • Kluge, Friedrich, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache, 24 durchgesehene, Berlin, Walter de Gruyter, 2002.
  • Lass, Roger, Old English, A Historical Linguistic Companion, Cambridge University Press, 1994.
  • Wright, Joseph, The English Dialect Dictionary, London, 1900.
  • Grimm, Jacob, and Wilhelm Grimm, Deutsches Wörterbuch, Leipzig, S. Hirzel, 1911.
  • Hatefeld, Adolphe, & Arsène Darmesteter, Dictionnaire Général de la Langue Française, Paris, Librairie Delagrave, 1926.
  • Holthausen, Ferd., Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Englischen Sprache, Leipzig, Bernhard Tauchnitz, 1927.
  • Johnson, Francis, A Dictionary of Persian, Arabic, and English, London, 1852.
  • Kent, Roland G., Old Persian, New Haven, Conn., American Oriental Society, 1953.
  • Kluge, Friedrich, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache, 24 durchgesehene, Berlin, Walter de Gruyter, 2002.
  • Lass, Roger, Old English, A Historical Linguistic Companion, Cambridge University Press, 1994.
  • Mencken, H.L., The American Language, Alfred A. Knopf, 4th ed., 1965.
  • Mills, A.D., A Dictionary of English Place Names, 2nd ed., Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  • Monier-Williams, Sir Monier, A Sanskrit-English Dictionary, Etymologically and Philologically Arranged, Oxford University Press, 1899.
  • Onions, C.T., ed., Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford University Press, 1933.
  • Partridge, Eric, Slang To-day and Yesterday, 3rd ed., Barnes & Noble, 1950.
  • Pokorny, Julius, Indogermanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch, Tübingen, A. Francke Verlag, 1959.
  • Rawson, Hugh, Wicked Words, Crown Publishers, 1989.
  • Smith, William, ed., A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: John Murray, 1878.
  • Thayer, Joseph Henry, Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, American Book Co., 1889.
  • Tucker, T.G., Etymological Dictionary of Latin, Ares Publishers, 1976 (reprint of 1931 edition).
  • Upton, Clive & J.D.A. Widdowson, An Atlas of English Dialect, Oxford Univ. Press, 1996.
  • Venezky, Richard L., The American Way of Spelling, The Guilford Press, 1999.
  • Wilson, R.M., and Reaney, Percy H., Dictionary of English Surnames, 3rd ed., Oxford Univ. Press, 1995.

I have also obtained some information in relation to rhyming from the following websites to ensure I'm on the right track.

  1. Berry, Mary: "Evovae", Grove Music Online ed. L. Macy
  2. Fun with Words - Consecutive letters
  3. Google Book Search results for "indivisibilities"
  4. Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases, 1911 Edition
  5. Fatsis, Stefan (2006-10-26). "830! How a carpenter got the highest Scrabble score ever. - By Stefan Fatsis - Slate Magazine". Slate.com. http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/gaming/2006/10/830.html?nav=ais.
  6. The Scrabble Omnibus, Gyles Brandreth, ISBN 0-00-218081-2
  7. Record for the Highest Scoring Scrabble Move at scrabulizer.com.
  8. A man of my words: reflections on the English language, Richard Lederer, ISBN 0312317859
  9. From the television programme QI
  10. From the Abergavenney Tourist Guide
  11. "Letters". Time (magazine). May 24, 1971. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,905063-2,00.html. Retrieved 2008-02-09. "Sondheim would, and did: To find a rhyme for silver Or any "rhymeless" rhyme Requires only will, verBosity and time."
  12. "Some observations on OED's March 2007 release of revised entries"



*New*: Get social with me. Let me know how to improve the rhymes found on this website.

~ You Go Rhymes! ~


Rhyming is not always about perfect rhyming, or end rhymes. It's finding words and their meanings, while portraying an intended message. There are many rhyme types and schemes found throughout You Go Rhymes with example rhymes and poems. Use syllable, consonant and vowel filters to help find the perfect word.


Quick Rhyme

Simple rhymes only. For more than one word or if you require rhymed filters, please go to the advanced filters form.

Advanced Rhyme Form

Types & Schemes

Although what you may see as a proper rhyme type or scheme for matching words, and other rhymes may not seem to fit at all. On You Go Rhymes!, you have access to many different types of rhymes and rhyme schemes.


4pics 1word help & answers


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